Facebook、脳からの神経信号を読み取るリストバンドを披露 ARメガネの入力用

米Facebookは3月18日(現地時間)、脳からの神経信号を読み取り、タイピングやスマートホーム端末の操作、ゲームなどをジェスチャーで行えるようにするリストバンド式のAR(拡張現実)インタフェースの計画を発表した。リストバンドは触覚フィードバックも備える。

このリストバンドのプロジェクトは、Facebookが2019年に買収した非侵襲的神経インタフェースを開発する米新興企業CTRL-labsの技術に基づいている。CTRL-labsは、脊髄の神経から手の筋肉に送られる、例えば「マウスをクリックする」「ボタンを押す」などの操作を指示する電気信号をデコードしてPCなどの無線接続した端末が理解できる信号に変換し、操作できるようにするリストバンドを開発していた。

Facebookはこのリストバンドはまだ開発の初期段階だとしているが、同社が開発中のARメガネの入力用コントローラーにする計画のようだ。Facebookは1月、年内に最初の「スマートグラス」を発売する計画を発表した。

機能紹介動画では、リストバンドをしたままテーブル上でタイピングすることでかなり高速でテキストを入力できたり、スマート電気スタンドの明るさを調整したりするデモが披露された。タイピングでは、リストバンドで入力する仮想キーボードは使うほどにユーザーのタイピングスタイルを学習し、徐々にユーザーに最適化されていく。

Implementation of Lightweight eHealth Applications on a Low-Power Embedded Processor

Abstract: The rapid development of Internet of Things (IoT) has opened new opportunities for healthcare systems through so-called eHealth systems. With the help of monitoring using portable IoT devices with biomedical sensors, disease diagnoses can be conducted in real time. However, there is a challenge in that monitoring is an always-on activity that requires constant power supply and IoT devices are battery-powered and face heavy resource constraints. This work addresses a realistic implementation of a low-power eHealth device using both hardware and software approaches …

What’s Next for Wearable Techonology

RT @casanacare: Thanks @WearablesExpert
I am preparing a virtual keynote for a big pharma player.
I will feature @apple @nuralogix @Valencell_Inc @casanacare
#healthcare #digitalhealth #EKG #BP #sleep #wearables

キャンピングカーでテレワーク 京急電鉄とCarstay、『モバイル・オフィス』利用の実証実験を実施

“動くオフィス”を京急沿線の横浜市南部エリアに設置、在宅勤務者や学生へ空間提供

京浜急行電鉄株式会社と、Carstay(カーステイ)株式会社は、横浜市南部(上大岡エリア・能見台エリア)の京急電鉄所有の遊休地に、Carstayの”動くオフィス”として利活用可能なキャンピングカー「モバイル・オフィス」をビジネスパーソンのワークスペースや学生の勉強スペースとして設置する実証実験を開始します。

利用は無料で、期間はそれぞれ、上大岡エリアは2021年2月22日(月)~2月26日(金)、能見台エリアは3月1日(月)~3月5日(金)です。1組(推奨1~2人、最大4人利用)、1時間の予約ができ、Carstayの「モバイル・オフィス」専用サイトから申し込むことが可能です。

Set up Home Assistant to manage your open source smart home

Learn how to install and configure Home Assistant in the fourth article in this series on home automation.

In the first article in this series, I introduced Home Assistant and why you might be interested in it. In short, Home Assistant is an automation hub for some of the most common smart devices on the market today. It enables centralized coordination of disparate hardware. By using it, you no longer have to choose suboptimal tech from a single vendor to manage your smart home from a single app. It also means you will no longer struggle with a hundred different apps that all function slightly differently to manage all your devices. One program to rule them all… or at least that’s the dream.

In the second and third articles, I looked at some of the decisions to make when developing home automation, namely local vs. cloud control, and whether to choose Zigbee, Z-Wave, or WiFi, just to hit the high points. This fourth article will be much more hands-on than the previous ones by walking you through setting up a virtual machine (VM) with the Home Assistant-provided image.

Set up the VM

I won’t cover all of the methods available for installing Home Assistant (HA). I run HA in a virtualized environment, and the official installation page provides VMDK, VHDX, VDI, QCOW2, and OVA downloads. I have a libvirt-based homelab, so I chose the QCOW2 image…